Fatherland by Robert Harris [A Review]

Fatherland was Robert Harris’ bestselling debut. The interest in it is perfectly understandable; it promises an intriguing combination of a murder mystery in the fascinating setting of post-War Berlin – where Germany has won the war. A body has washed up on a riverbank near Berlin, Germany. It is soon identified as Josef Bühler, a…

Four Books That ‘Changed’ Me

One of the pullout magazines that comes with my Sunday paper has a regular feature called ‘Books That Changed Me’. Usually they invite a local author to nominate four books and say a little about them. I thought I might attempt the same, though it is hard to think of four books that genuinely ‘changed’…

Genius by James Gleick [A Review]

We no longer have the words to describe Richard Feynman. ‘Brilliant’, ‘unique’ and ‘enigmatic’ do not serve him. Even the word ‘genius’ may have lost its power to describe him. Nevertheless, Genius is the title of James Gleick’s biography of the remarkable Richard Feynman. As the power of the word has depreciated through overuse, the…

Ten Books I Would Love to Reread

Some people say life is too short to finish bad books. It’s also too short to read all the books you want to, even if they were all good. It’s also too short to go back to the ones you loved and read them again. Then there are the ones you thought were bad, but…

New Book Acquisitions & Site News – August 2017

Only three books purchased?! What’s going on? That’s right; I only bought three books in August. There were no trips to second-hand stalls, no tempting sales, only the books I already intended to purchase. And on that, I am sticking with my recent resolution to get those books I had been avoiding. First up is…

Sea of Poppies by Amitav Ghosh [A Review]

Sea of Poppies, the first novel of Amitav Ghosh’s Ibis Trilogy, has all the credentials of a major literary work. It is an historical novel where disparate characters, trapped by the confines of class, caste, race, religion, gender, addiction or sexuality, fight for the opportunity to escape, transform and find independence. But despite this apparent…